EGSC Fall Institute 2021: Bodies, Identities, and Intersections

Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2021

2 bodies

Join The Education Graduate Students of Colour (EGSC) for their annual Fall Institute: 'Bodies, Identities, and Intersections'.

Date: October 25 - 28 October, 2021

Time: 6:00 to 7:00 PM EDT

Registration is required.


Event Description

The Education Graduate Students of Colour (EGSC) will host the Fall Institute 'Bodies, Identities, and Intersections,' with support from the office of the Vice-Dean of Governance and Student Affairs, Professor Francis Bangou. A series of four speakers will present over four evenings, from October 25th to 28th, providing members of our student community and teachers, the opportunity to unlearn. Professor Keri Cheechoo will deliver the opening keynote address. All presentations will be held from 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM. Registration required.


Presenters:


Keynote speaker: October 25, 2021


Professor Keri Cheechoo (she/her), an Iskwew from the community of Long Lake #58 First Nation, is an emergent Cree scholar who situates her pedagogy through both a praxis of ethical relationality, and her Nisgaa methodological framework which is framed by protocol, mamatowisin, or engaging inner mindfulness, and reciprocity. A published poet, Dr. Cheechoo uses poetic inquiry (an arts-based methodology) in a good way that connects her spiritual aptitude for writing with educational research. Professor Cheechoo seeks to share the missing histories, and the intergenerational and contemporary impacts of colonial violence on Indigenous women’s bodies, as a part of her commitment to the educational and reconciliation process toward Indigenizing school curricula.


Comic Books in the Classroom: October 26


Kim Hoang (she/her) is a Vietnamese-Canadian artist based in Tiohtià:ke/Montreal. She is a part of Canadian comics collective Love Love Hill which has toured at a variety of festivals and conventions in many cities, including Toronto, Montreal, and Tokyo. She has led classes and workshops about comics and games for various clients, including Concordia University and the Visual Arts Centre in Westmount. Kim also has a long history in event organizing, most notably serving as a programming coordinator for the Word Balloon Academy (Toronto Comic Arts Festival). Currently, Kim is working as a bookseller at Crossover Comics, and celebrating her love of the craft by creating Bed et Bédé, a comics-themed bed & breakfast.


The Relationality of Community Voices and Creating a Safe Space in the Classroom and Beyond: October 27


Madelaine McCracken (she/her/elle) is Red River Métis with her families being Chartrand and Bruce from St. Laurent and Winnipeg, Manitoba (Treaty 1 territory). Madelaine is the Education and Public Engagement Coordinator at the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, Graduate Representative for the Indigenous Students’ Association at the University of Ottawa and is also a PhD Graduate Student and Curriculum Scholar within the Faculty of Education also at the University of Ottawa. Madelaine is always on the journey to offer connections of how Truth and Reconciliation and how First Nations, Métis, and Inuit rights, perspectives, and values can be appropriately and respectfully represented in curricula expectations, schools, and classrooms across Turtle Island. These relational understandings can help the development of professional learning opportunities and sessions for educators, general learning community members, and organizations. She is passionate about supporting community in many ways, all to uplift voices and make differences. 


Healing the "body" in Education: October 28


Fatemeh Anvari (she/her) is an M.A.Ed. student at the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa, working on her thesis on Stories of Growth through Educating a Child with Down Syndrome. She is also interested in identity, cultural aspects of education, anti-racism, and children's literature. She has previously worked as an English teacher in Iran and is currently a supply teacher in Québec.

Yeti Mallavi (she/they) is a 2nd-year M.Ed student in the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. Her research interests include children's popular culture, identity, and informal learning spaces, and taught ESL in Quebec and Japan for 5 years.

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