Indigenous Research Chairs on Historical Memory and the Teaching of the Past

Posted on Monday, November 8, 2021

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Building Connections: Mobilizing Indigenous Histories for Social Change

Join us during our next event in series Building Connections: Mobilizing Indigenous Histories for Social Change, for the roundtable discussion ‘Indigenous Research Chairs on Historical Memory and the Teaching of the Past'. Professors Alan Corbiere, Brenda Macdougall and Pierrot Ross-Tremblay will explore themes of cultural appropriation and recolonization in educational contexts.

Date: November 10, 2021

Time: 7:00-8:30 p.m.

Registration is required


Event description:

Panel discussion around three big questions related to the speaker series: 1) How are Indigenous communities taking control over their own histories? 2) How can teachers in Indigenous and non-Indigenous schools and post-secondary institutions access these histories without appropriating them or recolonizing Indigenous peoples and their meanings, and 3) What are the best practices, pitfalls and possibilities in doing 1 and 2. Come prepared with questions. Audience members will be able to ask questions via the chat throughout the panel discussion. 


Presenters:

Professor Alan Corbiere is a Citizen of the M'Chigeeng First Nation and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous History of North America, Department of History, York University. As Canada Research Chair in Indigenous History of North America, Professor Corbiere hopes to “re-right” and “re-write” Indigenous history. He and his research team are using oral traditions and Anishinaabemowin and material culture (museum collections) to re-interpret colonial records. Their aim is to weave these sources together to revitalize Indigenous language, culture and knowledge to ensure it plays a central role in our understanding of the past. 

Professor Brenda Macdougall, University Research Chair in Metis Family and Community Traditions and Director, Institute of Indigenous Research and Studies, University of Ottawa. Professor Macdougall is a leading expert in the history of Métis and First Nations as University Research Chair in Metis Family and Community Traditions. The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities and the University of Ottawa established this chair, which will help increase our understanding of Métis history in general and specifically as it relates to identity, community formation and coherence. Macdougall is deeply committed to engaging with Métis and Aboriginal communities, organizations and policy makers. She regularly works with the Métis Nation of Ontario, for example, and makes presentations to this group as well as to the Canadian Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples, federal and provincial deputy ministers of Aboriginal Affairs, the Department of Natural Resources Canada and the Law Society of Upper Canada.

Pierrot Ross-Tremblay (Innu Essipit) is Professor at the Institute of Indigenous Research and Studies, University of Ottawa. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Intellectual Traditions and Self-Determination. His research focuses on memory and forgetting, resistance, sovereignties and effective self-determination.


The series is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Institute of Indigenous Research and Studies and the Faculties of Education and of Arts at the University of Ottawa. It is organized in collaboration with the History in Canada: First Peoples’ Perspectives project initiated by the Cégep de l'Outaouais, the Indigenous Affairs and the KitiganZibi First Nation Cultural Education Centre.

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