Tricia McGuire-Adams

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Tricia McGuire-Adams
Assistant Professor, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Ganandawisiwin (Good Health) Sovereignties

Room: LMX 434

Work E-mail: tmcguire@uottawa.ca

Biography

Tricia McGuire-Adams (from Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek) holds a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Ganandawisiwin/Good Health Sovereignties and is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education. Dr. McGuire-Adams’ research challenges deficit-based narratives within Indigenous health research by centering Indigenous dibaajimowinan (stories) of physical activity, health, and wellbeing. Her CIHR and New Frontiers in Research funded program of research looks to Anishinaabeg land-based learning, physical activities, and gikendaasowin (knowledge) about Indigenous disabilities and sport, to further amplify Indigenous peoples’ practices of health and well-being. Dr. McGuire-Adams is passionate about fostering Indigenous research methodologies in research and teaching, where she teaches PED 3138 First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives to teacher candidates within the Faculty of Education.  She is seeking to mentor undergraduate and graduate students, especially from Indigenous, Black, and People of Colour and/or other marginalized perspectives, who are committed to disrupting settler colonialism through their research.  

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

 

 

Indigenous Feminist Gikendaasowin: Decolonization through Physical Activity (2020)

Tricia McGuire-Adams

This book presents knowledge from Indigenous women who enact decolonization and wellbeing through physical activity.  In sport, physical activity, and health disciplines, there is a significant need for Indigenous women’s theoretical and methodological perspectives. While much research is published from a Western perspective on Indigenous peoples’ health, sport, and physical activity, less is known from Indigenous feminist and community perspectives. The chapters therefore inform the broader sociology of sport and Indigenous feminist fields on Indigenous cultural perspectives of physical activity.

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Paradigm shifting: Centering Indigenous research methodologies, an Anishinaabe perspective. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 12(1), 34-47.

Tricia McGuire-Adams

This paper showcases the importance of Indigenous research paradigms and, by extension, Indigenous research methodologies for Indigenous peoples within sociology of sport. Indigenous research methodologies are explored to highlight their specific components, including the engagement of decolonization, privileging Indigenous voices, the utilisation of Indigenous worldviews, and relational accountability. Building upon an Indigenous research methodology as a foundation, the paper presents an Anishinaabeg research paradigm that is used to assist the author in connecting mindfully and spiritually to their role as a researcher with the field of sociology of sport. 

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